Cast: Farhan Akhtar, Shraddha Kapoor, Arjun Rampal, Purab Kohli, Prachi Desai, Shashank Arora
Direction: Shujaat Saudagar
Genre: Drama
Duration: 2 hours 19 minutes
 
Story:
Aditya (Farhan Akhtar) seeks redemption. A freak incident disturbs him deeply. Unable to let go, he moves to Meghalaya for some soul-searching and immerses himself in humanitarian causes. Back in Mumbai, Joe (Arjun Rampal) now owns a posh club and judges a reality show. He is rich but numbed by succumbing to mediocrity. KD (Purab Kohli) still hopes to reunite with the two once again and make music someday.

Review:
While most sequels are remakes of the original, credit goes to Shujaat Saudagar for showcasing a new chapter in the lives of the members of ‘Magik’, the Rock band that caught our fancy eight years ago. The cult musical drama swayed the aficionados of Hindi film songs, luring them to rock music. Abhishek Kapoor’s fresh take on friendship tugged at your heartstrings with its effortless storytelling and legit conflicts between characters and within themselves. He didn’t tell you what you should be feeling about the protagonists, allowing you to interpret their vulnerabilities and distinct personalities. Thus, you could relate to a Joe Mascarenhas, who is forced to compromise on his values and sensibilities to ensure he puts food on the table.

Shujaat takes the camaraderie between Aditya, KD and Joe forward, this time adding the dilemma of Jiah (Shraddha Kapoor) to their existing set of traumas. While the gorgeous actress is a welcome addition to the group and renders a fine performance, her track seems forced and out of place. Overall, acting is one of the highlights of the film with Farhan, Purab and Arjun in particular, being extremely effective. Marc Koninckx’s cinematography is remarkable and deserves a special mention as well. On the flip side, Prachi Desai continues to play the mature wife, who yearns for the companionship of her regret-prone husband. Shashank Arora, who was terrific in Titli, gets nothing significant to do here either.

Also, the script is a major downer. It is way too contrived, directionless and morose to hold your interest. With no strong conflict point to hold it all together, the story goes haywire. The narration tries too hard to manipulate your feelings and spoon-feed emotions by explaining the unsaid thoughts of the characters, depriving you the joy of discovering it for yourself. Given the genre, the music of this film is a huge letdown. Barring the Usha Uthup track, it is not a patch on the former’s iconic songs.

Having said that, we are still open to a third instalment, provided Magik finds a valid reason to reunite. After all, music needs to come from the heart for you to feel it.